Edwardian Skirt & Petticoat

It’s done! My high-waist Edwardian Skirt is done, and with it the petticoat to go underneath.

Both the petticoat and skirt were made with the 10-gore skirt pattern from Truly Victorian. I made the base of the petticoat first, to test the fit. After slightly correcting the fit at the top (it was a bit too wide, otherwise it fit very well), I cut off the top part to make the petticoat sit at the waist. I added a drawstring to close it, and moved this closure to the front.

After hemming, it was time to add some trim and ruffle. I chose to add a broad strip of bobbin lace and one row of ruffles. There’s 2 meters of fabric in the ruffle alone, cut in 4 parts and sewn together, so 8 meters to gather and hem. I used a small rolled hem at the top and bottom, and gathered and sewed the ruffle to the underside of the lace.

The finished petticoat:

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The hem of the ruffle.

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The lace:

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The cord and closure

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In the mean time, I also started working on the skirt! Cutting the fabric was quite scary. I bought the wool in Edinburgh, so no possibility of getting more, and tartan wool isn’t the cheapest of fabrics. I used black cotton for the lining.

 

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Cutting the wool. I now know my living room is 5 meters long, it fit exactly… I spent quite some time laying out the pattern pieces, trying to get the plaid to match at the waistline.

 

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I didn’t take a lot of progress pictures, so a quick walk through. The first step was to flat-line the lining to the wool. After that, I made the placket for the closure and sew on all the hooks and eyes. A quick (dark) phone picture of this step:

Then it was time to sew all the panels together. Always the most fun, because it’s quickest and it now actually looked like a skirt!

Next up was making boning channels and inserting the bones and sewing the whole result to the seam allowances. Less fun, and loads of hand sewing. I used plastic boning, mainly because I’ll be wearing this over a corset anyway and it’s a lot cheaper than steel.

Next up, finishing! The top was finished with bias binding. Stitched to the right side by machine and turned over and hand-stitched down.

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The last step was the hem. After trying on the length with the petticoat, I sewed hem stiffener to the bottom. Then I cut a broad bias strip from black cotton and sewed it to the hem as facing. Finally, I hand-stitched the hem-facing down. And we’re done! Technically, I finished the last hand-sewing on the 2nd of January, but as I did all the other work last year, I’ll count it as a 2015 project.

So, some more pictures!

First a comparison of with and without petticoat. I hadn’t finished the hem yet on these pictures, but you can see the difference the petticoat makes!

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The closure:

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One of the bones and the facing at the top:

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And at the hem. The hem-stiffener is underneath.

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The whole thing! I quickly put my blouse on top for the effect. (I was lazy and didn’t do any underpinnings for the blouse, sorry!)

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My only regret on the skirt is that the center-back doesn’t line up. I matched up the pattern pieces, but made the mistake on doing it on one side of folded fabric. Turned out the fabric wasn’t lying completely straight. The other panels are fine, but one of the back panels was off. Ah well, better next time.

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It’s still very pretty though…

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Edwardian Corset Cover

Next item done! To hide the corset ridge, a corset-cover was worn between the corset and outer garments. As I’m planning to make a sheer(ish) blouse, it seemed like a good plan to make a corset cover as well. It has ruffles, moreover, which helps achieving the pigeon-breast silhouette.

I used the Truly Victorian Edwardian undergarment pattern, it worked great! I made this up very quickly, and the instructions were great. Next-up: Drawers and petticoat!

Pictures!

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White cotton – Underwear

I had a productive weekend, and made 2 new (under) garments. One is a new petticoat for over my 1860’s hoop, the other an Edwardian shift.

I started with the petticoat. My old one was quite heavy and seemed to do some weird things with my hoop dimensions, compressing it. As it was also not very period correct, being made of black polyester, I decided to make a new one. The new one isn’t quite as full, as I only had 3 meters of fabric, but it should do the job.

It consists of 2 rectangles, the first gathered to the waistband and the second gathered to the first. I started with the first rectangle, and put it on my hoop to measure for length.

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I then drew a line along the 2nd full hoop (so not the half-circle ones). I sewed the bottom strip along this line, and actually ended up with a petticoat which is pretty even along the hem! It’s just a bit short, due to lack of fabric, but with a velvet over-skirt (which is quite heavy), that shouldn’t be a problem. If I’ll ever make a new skirt for over this hoop with less volume, I might need to make another petticoat as well though.

 

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The second thing I made was an Edwardian shift. I used the Truly Victorian Edwardian underwear pattern (top left is the shift):

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I ended up skipping the lace along the arm holes, and just made a small seam there. It has lace along the neckline, and 4 pin-tucks in the front and 2 in the back. I pieced the back, because I was using left-over fabric and couldn’t fit the whole thing without a seam. I quite like it, there’s just something about white cotton, lacy underwear.

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Front

 

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Front-detail

 

 

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Back

 

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Back detail

 

Edwardian corset

I’ve been working on a new corset. This time it’ll be an S-bend Edwardian corset, ca. 1903. This type of corset is very specific for the time. It has a straight front, and a very sharply curved back, giving it the S-bend name.

These corsets are meant to minimize the waist, but to keep as much volume as possible in the hip and bust era.

I’m using the Truly Victorian pattern for this corset. It comes with a hip pad to add volume to the back and bust padding to fill up the front. I made the padding last year. It looks a bit weird on its own.

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I also already cut out the pattern pieces last year, and over Christmas cut and pinned the mock-up. Corsets are alwasy difficult to fit, but these even more so, so I decided it was close enough and will just go with my measurements. I’ve a gap at the top front, but that’s sort of the point as Edwardian corsets don’t really support the bust anyways. If it turns out too big, I can always make some more padding to fill it up. There’s loads of examples of Edwardian ‘bust-improvers’, so it would be very period.

Wearing History has a e-pattern of some bust-improvers which I might try.

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So now it’s time to sew! I’ll be using a beige coutil as strength layer and I’ve bought a lovely pale pink silk for the outer layer. It’s my first time working with silk, and I’m very excited but also a bit scared, because it’s so pretty! At the top of the corset I will use a lovely beige lace with tiny flowers and pearls. I’m also planning on trying out flossing for this corset, so it should turn out to be pretty fancy!

My phone camera doesn’t do the fabric justice, but just to get an idea. I want to layer the lace this way at the top.

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For the bottom of the corset I’m planning on using the top side of the lace in a thin border.

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Hoop skirt finished

It’s done! My new elliptical 1860’s hoop skirt. Some info:

Pattern: Truly Victorian 103

Fabric: White cotton

Notions: Loads of bias-tape for the bone casing, white tapes for the vertical support, 11mm steel hoop boning, 8 end-caps for the half-circle hoops and heat shrink to clasp the bones together.

The hoop is not entirely even, but close enough that it doesn’t matter with a petticoat over it. It is also similar enough to my previous hoop skirt to still fit with the petticoat and skirt I made before. It feels a lot sturdier than my previous hoop, and I’m very happy with it. I’m making my previous elliptical hoop into a 1850’s round hoop, but progress on that will follow later.

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The side view. Here it’s still knotted together at the waist, but by this point I’ve a clasp in place to reduce the bulk a bit. The tapes holding the half-hoops together behind the bum and legs also don’t work quite as well on the mannequin as on me, as it doesn’t have legs. The ‘gap’ between hoop four and five isn’t as obvious when I’m wearing it.

 

 

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A close-up of the half-wiring at the back.

 

 

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Another perspective.

 

 

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And the back view.

 

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With petticoat and skirt. The skirt is slightly long on the sides, but I’m confident that will be less when I wear it, as the mannequin was rather low and the hoop stands out a bit more towards the back on me.

 

 

 

Hoop skirt

This december I started on a new eliptical crinoline cage. My older one was made mostly out of plastic piping and ducttape, and while the piping was sturdy enough, it kept falling apart. As result, I’ve only worn in twice and was constantly worrying how it would keep. Not very pleasant, so I decided to make a new one, do it properly and with steel boning. So I ordered the pattern from Truly Victorian, the boning and loads of ribbon. Here some progress pictures. Good quality will follow when it’s done!

 

Making the bag:

 

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I couldn’t find proper bone-casing, so I chose to use 3 cm bias tape and folded it in half and stitched it together. This worked fine, although it was narrow for the 11 mm boning. Took a lot of stitching though, as it was 14 meters.

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I started with pinning everything together to check the length and even-ness. This is what it looked like before boning. A bit sad still.

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That’s better! With all the bones inserted and everything pined together.

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And with the ribbons between the half-circle hoops. This is what makes it stand out. Starting to look like a proper cage skirt.

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At this point, it looked finished, but everything was still just pinned in place. I shifted some of the hoops slightly, and then started hand-sewing all the ribbons to the hoops. Suffice, to say, this took some time.

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To attach the hoops in the front together, I was advised to use heat shrink with glue. I’d never heard of this, but it’s shrinkable plastic piping generally used to attach electric wiring together. It worked quite well, and is very sturdy! This is what it looked like before closing the bias tape over it.

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Almost done! So when it’s finished I’ll make some proper pictures to show.