Edwardian outfit – pictures

Last April I wore my full Edwardian outfit for a yearly fantasy event. There are always a lot of photographers present, and I met up with the same photographer who took the latest pictures of my 1860s ballgown, so I now have some very nice images of my outfit! All images were taken at Elfia, on the grounds of Castle de Haar (restrored from a medieval ruin between 1895 and 1912, so the outfit fits quite well with the grounds 😉 ).

I wore nearly my full Edwardian outfit, I only substituted my shift with a thermo-shirt as it was about 8C outside (seriously, it was the 25th of april, stupid weather). Luckily, we did manage to keep it mostly dry with only brief showers. Those are also the reason for the umbrella I’m carrying in some of the images.

What I made in this outfit: Bust-improvers, Corset, Corset-cover, Drawers, Petticoat, Blouse, Skirt, Jacket, Hat & Purse. The gloves are vintage and the umbrella was a necessary evil because of the weather. (by the way, an umbrella combined with a hat this size doesn’t work, no way to keep it centered above you as the hat is in the way. I just fled inside when it started to rain).

 

DSC09035

Photographer: Brigitte Jansen

elfia-14

Photographer: Ron Lauwers.

Erwin van den Eijkhof

Photographer: Erwin van den Eijkhof

 

SONY DSC

Photographer: Martijn van Huffelen

SONY DSC

Photographer: Martijn van Huffelen

SONY DSC

Photographer: Martijn van Huffelen

SONY DSC

Photographer: Martijn van Huffelen

SONY DSC

Photographer: Martijn van Huffelen

SONY DSC

Photographer: Martijn van Huffelen

SONY DSC

Photographer: Martijn van Huffelen

Display matters

I love browsing through the internet looking for historical dresses. There’s such richness out there, so many gorgeous examples. I find that it’s also very important how a dress is presented though. I recently found some photos of dresses on the hanger, or laying flat, and it’s such a shame. Clothing is 3-dimensional, and not meant to lie flat. I often tend to skip over badly photographed items, which is actually a shame, because the dresses themselves can be quite gorgeous.

In this post, some images on how much presentation matters.

Dress, ca. 1810-1815

Dress, ca. 1810-1815

 

The same garment, one on the hanger, with bad lighting. The other on a proper mannequin, with studio light. Look at the difference this makes!

Some more regency examples:

 

Dress, ca. 1800-1810

Gown, ca. 1810

The same two gowns. The studio lighting does so much more for the fabrics!

 

Gown , ca. 1800-1810

Gown , ca. 1800-1810. The bow in the front adds so much!

 

While for these regency dresses the difference is big, it becomes even greater when considering other silhouettes. Regency dresses are supposed to fall straight, but when hoops and bustles and corsets come into play, the silhouette is very different.

Bodice, 1873/1874

So much prettier when it’s filled out!

 

1888/1888

The left dress is the same. Look at the difference a good bustle makes!

 

This post is mostly a note to myself: to not dismiss dresses just because they’re not photographed well. And let’s just hope that all museums will make good inventory images in the future!