Victorian Picnic

At the beginning of the year, one of my goals was to visit more costuming events. So far that’s been quite successful, I’ve already been to three historical balls, which is two more than last year!

However, I figured that I could, of course, also contribute myself by organizing something. I needed to be relatively easy to organize due to time, so I settled on a picnic. And, as there seems to be a bit of a lack of Victorian events, it became a Victorian picnic!

The location was the castle de Haar, where I’ve been a volunteer for years. Having contacts at the location helps for letting them know of your plans, as just showing up with a group in costume isn’t always welcome. With advance notice though, we were welcome to picnic in the gardens!

It’s a very beautiful place, the castle was rebuilt from a medieval ruin around 1900, and the gardens stem from the same time.

Castel the Haar at Haarzuilens at Utrecht

 

We held the picnic halfway through August, and were quite lucky with the weather. It’s been very hot all summer, and right before and after the weekend there was some rain. However, on the day itself, it was a bit overcast but dry, and overall, the temperature was comfortable.

We’d decided to include the 1830’s as those often get lost between the Regency and Victorian era, and we nicely spanned the whole time period. Everyone looked really wonderful!

So we had some lovely 1830’s people.

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Picture by Nikki

 

Some 1870’s bustles.

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Picture by Nikki

 

And some representation of the very end of the century.

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Picture by Nikki

 

Everyone brought some food, we chatted, some walks were taken, and even some tennis played.

Pictures by Martijn, Jessie, Martijn, Nikki, Martijn & Jessie resp.

 

At the end, a group also decided to visit the castle as well, which was a perfect closure of the day.

Pictures by Nikki, Jessie & Nikki resp.

 

Also, Nikki made a vlog about the day, which you can find here!

 

Thanks to everyone who came for the lovely day, everyone looked fabulous!

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Picture by Nikki

A Ball in Brussels

A while back, I received information about a ball being held in Brussels by the Società di Danza, an Italian organisation for historical dances. There would be a rehearsal evening the day before the ball to learn the dances. I debated whether I would go, but received word that some friends would also be going a couple of weeks before, so I opted to come with them!

The period of the ball was mid 19th century, which meant I finally had an opportunity to wear my 1860’s ballgown to an actual ball. I had to make some slight changes to the skirt, as I’d replaced my hoop since making the gown, and it was therefore a bit long in the front. Not practial for dancing. I also chose to bustle up the back a bit, as the dress has a slight train. Very pretty, but again, not very practical in a ballroom.

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All bustled up!

 

 

This summer has been unusally hot, and of course, as the weekend approached, the days of the dance rehearsal and ball were predicted to be the warmest yet. With about 36 degrees, we were very happy with the airconditioning in the car as we drove to Brussels! The first day, we first had very hot weather, then a dust storm as the wind picked up, and then a thunderstorm as we drove to the rehearsal. It actually became dry again as soon as we arrived, and was still hot as before. In about 3 hours, we very quickly learned all the danced we’d be doing at the ball. A brief explanation, do it a couple of times, and move on. Most people there were familiar with the dances, but we weren’t, so although the explanations were very clear, it proved to be a challenge to actually remember the dances for the next day!

During the next day, we visited the lace and costume museum. The costume bit was a very modern exhibition, but the lace room was beautiful. We spent quite a bit of time admiring the antique laces.

 

One of my favourite things was this little lace shop.

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In the end, it became too warm and we spent the rest of the day finding shops with airconditioning until it was time to get ready.

The ball was held in a beautiful venue with a large ballroom, and sitting rooms along side. Luckily, it was not as warm as the rehearsal room. Wearing a corset and a black velvet dress, it was still very warm, but doable.

Mirrors are very convienient for costume pictures!

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The dancing was fun, although definitely a bit of a challenge! We were briefly shown a repetition, but that was all. Luckily, most people in attendance actually knew what they were supposed to do, so we could copy them and got along okay.

Dancing a quadrille, picture with thanks to the Società di Danza!

foto van Società di Danza.

 

And a walz about to start (I think). We’re in the bottom right corner.

foto van Società di Danza.

 

A group picture of all the lovely attendees!

foto van Società di Danza.

 

 

 

2018 plans

I’ve already done the 2017 in review, so now it’s time to look ahead!

I actually haven’t made too many specific plans for this year yet, but I do have a couple of ‘unfinished’ projects. These have either been started, or I’ve bought the fabric with a very specific purpose in mind.

The first project of the year is already done! An 17th century chemise for underneath my 1660’s dress.

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The only unfinished project I have at the moment is a pair of 18th century stays. These got pushed to the side line by other projects, but are already some way done. Those’ll be next. A little teaser:

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I also have two vintage-style dresses I still want to make. These were first planned for last year, but got pushed away by other projects. I have both the fabric and the patterns though, so these are high on the list. (Hopefully before it becomes too warm for long sleeves…?)

This, in a black floral.

Simplicity - 8050

And this one, in a grey plaid.

Simplicity - 8251

 

Another thing I’m thinking of is to make the steeple butterfly henin to go with my burgundian dress. That was the original plan, but due to lack of time I first made a smaller, flowerpot style henin. I do love the slight crazyness of the style though, so I’d like to make the taller one as well.

The lady in yellow has the hanging part of the veil folded back up. Note the gold loops. This image is from King René's tournament book.

 

Those are the concrete plans! After that, it gets a little more vague, but I do have a number of fabrics I want to use next year.

I think I might first go towards the 18th century. I’ve made a bum roll and petticoat for the 17th dress, those would both work for 18th century, and with the stays made I’d only need a shift to complete the undergarments. I also have an 18th century themed event in October, so that’d be a good goal.

I just got this silver damask fabric, and I think it’d be perfect for a round gown. I like the idea of starting the 18th century journey with a round gown, as it’s really one garment and doesn’t require a separate petticoat. Most round gowns are also relatively simple trim-wise (they often don’t have any), so that allows me to really focus on fit and silhouette. Plus, with the damask fabric many frills aren’t necessary.

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Something like this dress from the MET? I like the idea of matching my fabric with a black belt. And white lace and fichu?

Ensemble | American | The Met

 

What gets made also depends on events as well. If I have a time-specific event, that’ll probably be what gets made first. I have plenty of fabric and ideas in any case.

One is a sheer black cotton I was thinking of making an early Victorian dress of. Something like this? I love how the sheerness of the fabric is used in the design.

Vanaf 1830 komt de nadruk steeds meer te liggen op wijduitstaande rokken. Door vele onderrokken te dragen wordt dit effect bereikt. De zware rokkenvracht…

 

But I also have the materials for several other possibilities. A gorgeous red/black/gold plaid silk, combined with black maybe for this left number?

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Der Bazar 1886

 

Or a light gold flower patterned silk which was talking about the 1830’s to me.

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For something like this maybe?

Evening dress | British | The Met

 

It’s fun to dream in any case! I might do another post with plans half way through the year, if stuff is more concrete by then :).

Aside from the dressmaking plans, I also want to visit a few more historical events this year. I’d wanted to in 2017 as well, but things got sold out so some fell through. In the end, I only went to Bath and missed all more local events. This year has started off well though, as the first historical ball is already past! I also have a regency ball in my calendar in May, so either the red/white or the blue/silver dress will finally get a proper outing. And in October there’s a soiree with an 18th century theme, to which I hope to wear something 18th century. The theme for this is not as strict, so other historical stuff is also allowed, but I’d like to make something new. If the silver round gown gets made, I’ll probably wear it there! And who knows, some more events might come up!

The 1660’s dress in action! New-year’s ball in Ghent

Last weekend I wore the full 1660’s ensemble for the first time! Although I’d been looking at this period for longer, the theme of this years new-years ball in the opera of Ghent was the perfect excuse to actually start. The theme was inspired by the early days of Versailles, and was 1660 to 1715, so I was one of the ‘old fashionably’ dressed. There were a couple more beautiful 1660’s gowns, but also some wonderful late 17th century ones, which was nice as it’s not a style to see too much.

We arrived in Ghent early afternoon, had some lunch and then went to the hotel to change. Luckily, we had quite some space and very good mirrors in the room, which really helped with changing. Doing some last-minute sewing, hair, and actually getting dressed took some time, and we were ready just in time for the ball!

My hair was inspired by these images:

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I curled the front of my hair with rags, put in the evening before the ball. As it looks quite ridiculous with the rags in, I wore a vintage-style most of the day. Perfect for hiding curlers! I’m really happy with how my hair turned out, a big thanks to Josselin for helping me, as it did require more than 2 hands!

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The ball itself was very nice, with quite a lot of dancing. There was a dance room, a room to sit and one where you could get drinks. Other than the dancing, there was not much in terms of entertainment and there was no food, but given the price of the evening I expected this, and I wanted to dance anyway. There was also a small baroque-dance demonstration at the end, which was very nice to see.

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Watching the demonstration

 

The building was really beautiful, and fit in perfectly with the dress code. Thanks to Josselin for these images, as I forgot my pocket and left my phone in my bag most of the evening…

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All in all, I had a lot of fun, and will definitely keep an eye out for next year’s theme!

The pictures of the full outfit!

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1880s Winter bustle – pictures

Yesterday I wore my 1880’s dress for the first time, to the Midwinter Fair. It was really nice to wear, and even though it was rainy I had a good time.

Because of said rain, we only took some pictures inside. By this time my curls had started to sag a bit, but I was quite happy with how my hair turned out. Not having bangs, I flipped two curls towards the front and pinned them in place underneath the hat. Looks ridiculous without the hat, but with hat you’d never know!

 

Today it’s been snowing all day. Snow doesn’t happen that much around here, and when it does it usually disappears very quickly again. So I thought I’d take advantage, and dragged my boyfriend outdoors for a couple of minutes to take some more pictures. I didn’t curl my hair this time, too much effort, but the braid this way also works okay. And the dress looks really pretty in the snow!

 

You can’t really see it in these pictures above, but I’m wearing my winter boots with them! Very nicely warm and comfy.

 

 

Some more pictures!

 

Construction post is here!

Late 15th century burgundian gown

After making a medieval smock and kirtle, it was finally time to start on the dress that started the whole medieval journey: a silk damask burgundian gown.

This project originally started with this fabric, which I found for a bargain and couldn’t resist.

2017

It took a while to decide what to use it for, but eventually this painting convinced me to make a late 15th century burgundian gown.

c.1449 Late Middle Ages- Houppelande Gown

Mine will be a little narrower through the bust and sleeves and with a wider neckline, making it a bit more late 15th century.

The journey started with figuring out the layers here, and I eventually decided to make a smock, front-lacing kirtle, placket for the neckline and burgundian with black velvet collar and cuffs.

I adapted the pattern from my kirtle to make the burgundian gown. I drafted the collar following the book the Medieval tailor’s assistant, and gave a little extra space around the waist. Not too much, as I was going for a rather fitted version of the burgundian.

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Inspiration picture for the shape and pattern adaption. Bottom left shows the kirtle pattern behind the new draft of the burgundian (front). Wider shoulder with drawn-on collar, extending the line below the waist, and slightly widened on the side as well. Bottom left is fitting with sheets! 

 

The skirt was drafted following the layout kindly shared by A dressmakers’ workshop here. Basically, the front opening is put on the straight of fabric, the skirt angling away, and only the back has a wide gore. Because the way the front is cut, the fabric falls to the front and you only need the back gore. It’s quite clever, and makes for very efficient cutting.

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My cutting lay out. Front and back are facing the same way. The gore was cut on the fold of the empty part at the top. Upside down, but as you can see on the right you have to look closely to see when the fabric turns.

 

I got a bit lucky with the fabric in that the center of the pattern was close to the selvage of the fabric, so I could cut rather efficiently despite having to pattern match. I did opt to cut the back gore the other way around than the rest of the dress. You have to look quite closely to notice the pattern is upside down there, and I now have enough fabric left to make something else with the rest.

I did all the main seams by machine, and finishing by hand. When I’d put in the back gore, however, I didn’t like how it fell. I put it too far down, when it should’ve extended directly from the waist. So unpicking happened, and I moved it up a bit, which worked a lot better.

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Left was before; right after. Much better

 

After the main construction, it was part to work on the lining including the collar. I somehow got the idea to only line the top part and hem. Not the easiest thing in retrospect, but I didn’t have enough fabric to do it otherwise, so partial lining it was! The velvet for the collar was sewn to the lining, and then the whole thing was sewn onto the dress and turned inside out. Took a little fiddling, but I got it right in the end. This tutorial by Izabella from Prior Attire was very helpful!

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The collar finished, back and front. Still has some pins at this point, I later tacked the collar to the dress to help it stay flat.

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Next up: Sleeves! I adapted the sleeves from my kirtle pattern slightly, just widening it a bit in the bottom part so it would still fit over my kirtle. The bottom of the sleeves have black velvet cuffs.

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Top right shows sleeve fitting, here shown with the dress turned inside out, so you can also see where the lining stops. Bottom right is sewing on the cuffs, left the finished sleeves.

 

After the sleeves, the final thing was the hem lining. I made it about 50cm wide, which just fit out of my fabric with careful planning. I wanted it this wide so I could pull up the skirt to my belt, as walking outside in a train at events isn’t usually the best idea.

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Top: finished inserted sleeves. Bottom left: pinning down the hem facing before hand-stitching it in place. Bottom right: tucking the skirt into my belt. Doesn’t work too well yet because the belt is elastic, but shows the general idea.

 

Of course, you cannot wear a medieval burgundian gown without some sort of crazy head wear. I eventually want to make a steeple hennin with butterfly veil, but I ended up finishing my dress 3 days before an event. Because the large hennin would take more than 3 days and it’s a good plan to have a slightly more practical head wear choice as well, I made a shorter henin for the event.

The lady in yellow has the hanging part of the veil folded back up. Note the gold loops. This image is from King René's tournament book.

The crazy steeple hennin with butterfly veil. Unpractical, but fun!

Google Image Result for http://resources42.kb.nl/MIMI/MIMI_MMW_10A11/MIMI_MMW_10A11_235R_MIN_2.JPG

For now, I went for something more like this.

First up was a fillet of black velvet. Cut on the bias so it stretches around the head, this is worn as a type of head-band and serves to keep the head dress in place. It also has the very characteristic black loop over the forehead. I tried to turn a velvet tube inside-out, but my pulling thread broke half-way through so I finished the loop by hand.

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Black velvet fillet with black forehead loop.

 

The pattern for the hennin is from the Medieval tailor’s assistant again, the base made out of buckram. I covered it in black silk, with a cotton black lining (because I ran out of linen). The side edges are turned over, the top and bottom finished with binding. Velvet at the bottom, to make it grip to the fillet better. The sides were stitched together by hand. The finishing touch is a black velvet frontlet draped over the front of the hennin. I might make a veil as well in the future, but as I didn’t have the fabric yet I left it off for now.

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Making the hennin. Top shows the buckram (testing for size) and the lining before it’s stitched together. Bottom left is the finished hennin, bottom right is the complete thing modeled by my bear.

 

The finishing touch was to make a placket for the front of the dress out of black linen and silk. This was a day before the event, so I didn’t really take pictures. I ended up pinning the placket to the burgundian as that worked best, but it still wrinkled and shifted a bit. So I think I’ll be extending the placket to go around the body, as was my original plan.

I’m very happy with how the dress turned out, and although I have some small projects left to update it, it’s now wearable! I ended up using a black elastic belt while I look for a proper medieval version, but it actually looks surprisingly okay for something so modern.

Thanks to my friend Sophia for taking some pictures last weekend at Castlefest! I took down the small train for the images, but wore it up the rest of the day to prevent the people behind me from stepping on it.

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A visit to Bath – Part II

In my last blog post I wrote about our visit to Bath early May, but not about our weekend activities. Of course, the whole incentive for travelling to Bath was the Victorian ball on Saturday, so this blog is about the ball-related events!

Saturday morning we first returned the rental car and walked back to the city center. We took a little time to visit the Victoria Art gallery, and afterwards met a friend of Marije for lunch. We were a bit tired already from all the activities, so kept the morning relaxed.

After lunch, it was time for the dance workshop! The dance master for the event walked us through several of the dances which would be done during the evening. It was nice to get a measure of the steps and already meet some people. Before we knew it, it was 5pm, and we hurried back to our B&B to get changed for the ball!

We were very lucky with our B&B, where we had a sitting room available to us as well as a bedroom. This meant room to get changed, and because it was gorgeously decorated, a location to take some pictures! By the time we got our hair done and dresses on it was already past the time we wanted to leave, so we kept it short, but still managed to get some nice images.

 

 

After pictures, it was time for the ball! We were met by the hostess and organizer, Izabella from Prior Attire at the door, and walked on to the parlour room where I attached my train (not daring to wear it outside). Not too long after we arrived, the ball proper started! Half-way through there was a short break in the dancing for some food, which was very good. We also stopped by the event photographer, and afterwards the dancing resumed again.

 

The whole ball was lovely. The music was very nice, and the dance master did a great job in managing to explain the steps clearly without the instructions dragging on too long, which can be quite a feat. The location was also lovely. The assembly rooms are quite large and can feel a bit ’empty’ because of its very classical style and high ceilings. But especially after it got a bit dark and the chandeliers turned on it was very pretty. It’s also such a historical location that it was wonderful to experience an event like this there.

I didn’t take my proper camera, but phone pictures were definitely taken!

 

 

Finally, all the guests looked absolutely amazing! I spent some time just sitting and watching others dance. So many gorgeous outfits, the standard was really very high. On top of that, everyone was incredibly kind. We didn’t know anyone who would be there, but everyone was very open and nice, and continuously complimenting others on their dresses. I was also really happy to meet some people I’d been following online for a while, and it was great to see their creations.

 

After the ball we walked home on sore feet, and after undressing, had a good night’s sleep. Not too long though, because we wanted to join the breakfast in the pump rooms the next morning! This was not an official part of the event, but everyone could just show up on their own. We left a bit early and took some pictures outside first.

 

When we saw some other ladies in costume we went to join the queue to be seated. They very kindly invited us to join them, and it was very nice to chat with them over breakfast. We managed to talk with some other guests all during breakfast, and both Izabella and the dance master from the previous evening took the time to walk by the other tables and have a short chat with everyone. Some pictures were taken again as well, this time in front of the fountain!

 

 

After breakfast we took a bit of a stroll back to our B&B. We definitely got a bit of attention, but all of it positive. A very funny moment was when we entered a little gallery, and after posing for the owners quite extensively, saw there was a large group of Chinese tourists standing right in front of the door waiting for their bus. Of course we couldn’t slip by unnoticed, so many more pictures were taken.

We finished our stroll with a quick detour into Sidney Gardens, which had some more gorgeous scenery for photos!

 

 

Alas, after arriving in the B&B it was time to get changed, and wait for our cab to take us to the train, as our flight left early that evening. We had a wonderful time in Bath, and the ball and breakfast were the perfect events to end the holiday with!

A visit to Bath

The first week of May I visited Bath with a friend. The main incentive was the Victorian ball held there, but we also took the time to visit the city and a bit of the countryside. More about the ball later, but for now pictures of the rest of our visit!

We arrived in Bath late Wednesday morning. After dropping off our things we went into the city to just wander around a bit. Wandering turned in to visiting loads of shops very quickly… Just a warning: Bath isn’t very good for your wallet.

After browsing the shops and getting some souvenirs, it was time for tea! My friend arranged a high tea in the pump rooms for my birthday, and it was really great. It’s such a lovely setting, and the food was very good.

 

 

After tea we had just enough time to visit the Roman baths, which originally gave the town its name. The whole museum around the baths was very well set-up, and it was definitely an impressive place to visit! This picture is of the King’s bath, which is the original hot spring. You can see the windows of the pump rooms above the bath.

 

 

Because we had tea late in the afternoon we wandered around Bath a bit more before going do dinner, visiting the Georgian streets, including the Circus and the Royal Cresent. The roses and wisteria were in bloom. So pretty!

 

 

On Thursday we first visited the Jane Austen Center, and afterwards went to the fashion museum! They had two exhibitions on, one ‘a history of fashion in a 100 objects’ and the other one was ‘lace’. It was really impressive, and great to see a number of true icons I’d only seen pictures off. I won’t post all my pictures here to avoid cluttering, but there’s more on my pinterest. Also go there to see the full size! Much better for drooling over details.

This one I was most excited about beforehand, and it didn’t disappoint. The silver fabric still has some sparkle to it, which definitely comes across better in real life! Silver tissue and parchment lace dress, ca. 1660

Ca. 1660 silver tissue dress with parchment lace. Fashion museum Bath:

 

Another one of the very old items. A gorgeously embroidered jacobean jacket, ca. 1620. The embroidery was stunning, incredibly detailed and colorful. As always, the pictures don’t do the metalwork (the golden swirls) justice. They sparkle as you move.

ca. 1620 Jacobean jacket. Fashion museum Bath.:

 

This dress I didn’t know beforehand, but immediately fell in love with. (I’ve got a thing with black lace, in case you hadn’t noticed). The color was very pretty in real life as well, and that trim…

1860s Victorian dress in pale green with black lace. Fashion museum Bath:

 

Final stop of the day was Bath Abbey, which was very impressive as well, and had the most amazing ceiling.

 

 

Friday we rented a car to go exploring a bit, and ended up visiting Lacock and Glastonbury. Lacock is a very scenic town used in a lot of movies as a location. Just next to the town is Lacock Abbey, which is part medieval abbey part aristocratic country house. Also a lovely place, and with all the flower bushes growing outside it was stunning. And of course, the halls of Hogwarts are inside!

 

 

In Glastonbury we mostly just visited the grounds with the old abbey ruins. Most of it is gone now, but it is still an incredibly impressive and beautiful place.

 

 

Saturday morning we took the opportunity to visit the Victoria Art gallery, shopped some more (tea shops!) and afterwards met a friend for lunch. And after lunch it was time for the dance workshop! More about the workshop, ball and breakfast on Sunday in the next post!

Edwardian outfit – pictures

Last April I wore my full Edwardian outfit for a yearly fantasy event. There are always a lot of photographers present, and I met up with the same photographer who took the latest pictures of my 1860s ballgown, so I now have some very nice images of my outfit! All images were taken at Elfia, on the grounds of Castle de Haar (restrored from a medieval ruin between 1895 and 1912, so the outfit fits quite well with the grounds 😉 ).

I wore nearly my full Edwardian outfit, I only substituted my shift with a thermo-shirt as it was about 8C outside (seriously, it was the 25th of april, stupid weather). Luckily, we did manage to keep it mostly dry with only brief showers. Those are also the reason for the umbrella I’m carrying in some of the images.

What I made in this outfit: Bust-improvers, Corset, Corset-cover, Drawers, Petticoat, Blouse, Skirt, Jacket, Hat & Purse. The gloves are vintage and the umbrella was a necessary evil because of the weather. (by the way, an umbrella combined with a hat this size doesn’t work, no way to keep it centered above you as the hat is in the way. I just fled inside when it started to rain).

 

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Photographer: Brigitte Jansen

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Photographer: Ron Lauwers.

Erwin van den Eijkhof

Photographer: Erwin van den Eijkhof

 

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Photographer: Martijn van Huffelen

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Photographer: Martijn van Huffelen

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Photographer: Martijn van Huffelen

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Photographer: Martijn van Huffelen

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Photographer: Martijn van Huffelen

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Photographer: Martijn van Huffelen

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Photographer: Martijn van Huffelen

Regency spencer (and more) finished

When I decided to make a spencer jacket so I could wear my new regency dress outside, I also immediately had a whole other list of ‘things to make’. I needed a bonnet, and as my hands get very cold I wanted a muff. And as I was looking at fashion plates, I also noticed that there’s usually a chemisette worn beneath spencers, so I also wanted one of those. Only problem; I had about 3 weeks to make everything, while working full time and doing all other stuff I already planned. I started with the spencer, as seen in the previous post. After this, the priority was the bonnet.I managed to finish those on time, so I also made a muff. It’s so simple, but very nice with the cold weather! I made mine of white faux fur and lined it with white cotton. I also put some fiber fill between the fur and cotton layer, for extra isolation. Finally, I sewed hooks and eyes to the inside and made a ribbon. The hooks make the ribbon detachable.

For the chemisette, I based my pattern on one of the chemisettes in Janet Arnolds’ book. Of course, I loved the one with all the little pleating in front and mushroom pleated collar. I decided to just start with the garment and see how far I’d come, but I actually finished on time. I only made 6 pleats on each side of the front piece. Mostly, I must admit, because it was a pain to do and I thought it looked good enough this way. All the pleats are set in place by repeated ironing and then sown with tiny stitches to secure it. The collar I improvised, having no clue how to mushroom pleat a collar. This chemisette is also the first garment I completely sewed by hand!

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The photo quality is bad, but you can just see the tiny stitches to keep the pleats in place.

 

 

 

Last weekend, I wore the whole outfit, and had a lovely day. I made almost everything I’m wearing, with the exception of the leggings and thermo shirt underneath to keep warm. I’m wearing my stays, blue dotted regency dress, spencer jacket, chemisette, muff and bonnet. My friend took some lovely pictures of me.

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