Edwardian Skirt & Petticoat

It’s done! My high-waist Edwardian Skirt is done, and with it the petticoat to go underneath.

Both the petticoat and skirt were made with the 10-gore skirt pattern from Truly Victorian. I made the base of the petticoat first, to test the fit. After slightly correcting the fit at the top (it was a bit too wide, otherwise it fit very well), I cut off the top part to make the petticoat sit at the waist. I added a drawstring to close it, and moved this closure to the front.

After hemming, it was time to add some trim and ruffle. I chose to add a broad strip of bobbin lace and one row of ruffles. There’s 2 meters of fabric in the ruffle alone, cut in 4 parts and sewn together, so 8 meters to gather and hem. I used a small rolled hem at the top and bottom, and gathered and sewed the ruffle to the underside of the lace.

The finished petticoat:

IMG_5328

 

The hem of the ruffle.

IMG_5327

 

The lace:

IMG_5325

 

The cord and closure

IMG_5324

 

In the mean time, I also started working on the skirt! Cutting the fabric was quite scary. I bought the wool in Edinburgh, so no possibility of getting more, and tartan wool isn’t the cheapest of fabrics. I used black cotton for the lining.

 

 photo 20151025_113427_zpsyv9l1gwm.jpg

Cutting the wool. I now know my living room is 5 meters long, it fit exactly… I spent quite some time laying out the pattern pieces, trying to get the plaid to match at the waistline.

 

 photo 20151025_162711_zpsgbdrcjhb.jpg

I didn’t take a lot of progress pictures, so a quick walk through. The first step was to flat-line the lining to the wool. After that, I made the placket for the closure and sew on all the hooks and eyes. A quick (dark) phone picture of this step:

Then it was time to sew all the panels together. Always the most fun, because it’s quickest and it now actually looked like a skirt!

Next up was making boning channels and inserting the bones and sewing the whole result to the seam allowances. Less fun, and loads of hand sewing. I used plastic boning, mainly because I’ll be wearing this over a corset anyway and it’s a lot cheaper than steel.

Next up, finishing! The top was finished with bias binding. Stitched to the right side by machine and turned over and hand-stitched down.

IMG_5339

The last step was the hem. After trying on the length with the petticoat, I sewed hem stiffener to the bottom. Then I cut a broad bias strip from black cotton and sewed it to the hem as facing. Finally, I hand-stitched the hem-facing down. And we’re done! Technically, I finished the last hand-sewing on the 2nd of January, but as I did all the other work last year, I’ll count it as a 2015 project.

So, some more pictures!

First a comparison of with and without petticoat. I hadn’t finished the hem yet on these pictures, but you can see the difference the petticoat makes!

IMG_5333 IMG_5331

 

The closure:

IMG_5335

IMG_5404

 

One of the bones and the facing at the top:

IMG_5409

And at the hem. The hem-stiffener is underneath.

IMG_5411

 

The whole thing! I quickly put my blouse on top for the effect. (I was lazy and didn’t do any underpinnings for the blouse, sorry!)

IMG_5413

IMG_5416

 

My only regret on the skirt is that the center-back doesn’t line up. I matched up the pattern pieces, but made the mistake on doing it on one side of folded fabric. Turned out the fabric wasn’t lying completely straight. The other panels are fine, but one of the back panels was off. Ah well, better next time.

IMG_5418

IMG_5417

 

It’s still very pretty though…

IMG_5419

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “Edwardian Skirt & Petticoat

  1. Heb je die stof toevallig gekocht in het winkeltje vlakbij het kasteel in Edinburgh? Wel leuk dat je van daar stof hebt meegenomen!
    De rok ziet er echt mooi uit (^-^) Dat het patroon niet helemaal aansluit is jammer, maar dat was vroeger vast ook niet altijd zo 😉

    • Dankje! Ja, bij de Tartan Mill inderdaad. Ik zocht echte wol met ruit voor een redelijke prijs, en daar hebben ze dat nog wel in de uitverkoop ;). Hoef je in Nederland niet te proberen als je meer dan 1,5 meter nodig hebt ;).

  2. Pingback: 2015 – Year review | Atelier Nostalgia

  3. Pingback: Inspiration – Edwardian tartan | Atelier Nostalgia

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s