Regency spencer jacket

Now my blue regency dress is done, I want to wear it and the next event is in a couple of weeks, so good news for me! The only problem, it’s outside, in the Netherlands, in December. So thin silk and cotton are not going to cut it. I therefore decided to make a spencer jacket. And a muff. And a bonnet. And if possible a chemisette. A bit optimistic, but who knows. In any case, the spencer has the priority here, and as I already had the pattern and fabric, this should be very doable. So two weeks ago I cut and printed and assembled the pattern. I made the mock-up and made adjustments. Last week, I cut the fabric, the lining, sewed them together and pinned the bodice together. Last weekend I assembled the pieces, made the collar and sleeves, put everything together and finished the raw edges. I even started on the button-holes. Because, of course, for a last-minute project it’s a good plan to make 5 hand-sewn button-holes. Well… at least it’ll be pretty when it’s done! At the time of writing, I’ve made 3 button-holes and attatched the buttons, so if I run out of time it will close with 3 instead of 5 buttons!

Finished pictures will come after the 7th of December, when the event has happened, but I have some construction pictures!

The spencer is made from light-weight blue wool, which is gorgeous, but should really be seen in daylight. My flash doesn’t do it justice. The lining is white cotton, and I used Sense & Sensibility’s spencer pattern, but adapted it to have a high closure and fit my figure a bit better.

The inside of the sleeves before attaching them to the bodice.

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Gathering the sleeve cap

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The bodice assembled, before finishing the edges and the sleeves.

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And from the outside, on my dummy

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And from the back.

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Pinning the sleeve into the arm-hole.

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And with the sleeves attatched and the edges finished. Pinned to close.

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Close-up of the sleeve cap. The color is a bit weird here, it’s prettier in person.

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From the back!

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And a little preview of it worn over my dress! I’m still in love with the fabric, this picture shows the color best.

 

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Blue dotted regency dress – Finished!

I finally got around to make some photo’s of my new dress! I also made long sleeves, but I forgot to take one when we took the pictures, so I only made pictures with the short-sleeved option.

 

 

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The front of the dress. Two puffed sleeves and a gathered front to the bodice. The outer fabric is sheer silk, so I lined it with the blue cotton I also used for the waist and sleeve bands.

 

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I wanted the front of the dress to not be gathered, to create a slimmer silhouette, which I think worked out quite well!

 

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From the side. I made loads of gathers in the back for the regency ‘pouf’. (Does my butt look big in this? Yes? Good!)

 

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And from the back. I made the closure with hooks and eyes, with a ribbon at the bottom of the waist band to ensure that fitted closely.

 

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Center back.

 

Construction posts:

Dress construction

Concept

Inspiration – Blue Natural Form

Another inspiration post. I started looking for images for this post with the idea of selecting any blue natural form fashion plate dress I liked. Apparently, that wasn’t specific enough, as I was finished with over 25 images. So for this post, my favorite dark-blue natural form fashion-plate dresses. Maybe I’ll do a light blue version later…

 

Inspiration

I noticed that I haven’t posted any historical sewing updates since the summer. I have been working on several projects though, and some are nearing completion. My blue regency dress is (finally) truly finished, so as soon as I can make some decent pictures I’ll write a post about it. I’m also working on 4 other projects, of which 3 are historical, so there’s more to come.

Meanwhile, it’s time for another inspiration post! This time about chintz, or rather, the 18th century (originally) Indian version of it. This fabric was used a lot in the Netherlands, including in much of the traditional clothing. I might write a more informational post on this type of chintz soon, but for now it’s time for pretty pictures. Starting with some jackets, on to dresses. In (somewhat) chronological order.

Rijksmuseum Amsterdam – 1810-1820

Fries Scheepvaart Museum

DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum 1755-75

Late 18th century

© Hugo Maertens — Bruges, Belgium 1750-1800

V&A, 1770-1780

Museum Rotterdam – 1780 – 1785

Winterthur Museum Collection – 1785-1795

Met, 1785–95

The Kyoto Costume Institute – 1780s

V&A – 1790-1795

Private collection Barreto-Lancaster – 1795